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Kategorie: shoe

shoeporn: Puma – Deviate Nitro

Undoubtedly Puma is no stranger to the running game. One of their prime athltes was Ethiopian Abebe Bikila who won the marathon of the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo wearing a pair of Puma running shoes. Defending his title from Rome 1960, which he won without wearing any shoes. Having had a massive impact on the worldwide T&F scene with the likes of Linford Christie and legendary Wilson Kipketer, the company further increased their fanbase with the early signing of superstar Usain Bolt. When Puma signed Bolt in 2003, he was only 16 years old, but this deal certainly paid off.
Although being a recognized brand within the sprint scene, the company seemed to have forgotten its roots that, besides football, lies within running. In the beginning of 2021 a lot of professional runners switched sponsors and Puma appeared behind the name of a lot of recognized distance runners. With the Nitro range the company seem to hit the scene with new and promising products.
The Deviate range symbols Pumas homecoming to the serious performance side of running. The very first prototypes made a lot of noise within the scene and Puma marked their return to the market with their interpretation of a carbon-fiber plate road running shoe.
In 1924 Rudolf and his brother Adolf “Adi” Dassler formed the so called “Dassler Brothers Shoe Factory”. When they split in 1948, Adi went on to develop his own brand named Adidas and Rudolf established a new company called Ruda. Ultimately he changed the companies name into Puma and introduced the well-known symbol and the characteristic “Formstrip” in 1958. Until today both companies are situated in the small Franconian town Herzogenaurach in Bavaria, Germany.
Puma offers two high-end models. The Deviate Nitro that’s studied here and the Deviate Elite as the absolute top range model. The crucial alteration between these two shoes is the foam material. Back in the days, way before the carbon excitement, companies used EVA material as the attention was more on cushion then on rebound. Then the carbon-bouncy propaganda took over and nothing has been the same since.
The so-called Pebax material is the new reference class for springy shoes. Every company does use somewhat comparable. So does Puma for the Elite Version. The Nitro instead has a TPE sole. The presentation of this sole paired with the carbon plate is incredible. The structure and the placement of the foam generates a tremendously comfortable and lively piece of equipment. The Deviate Nitro is well-cushioned and the toe-off is speedy and energetic as you stride forward.
A very nice feature of the Deviate line is that there are specific models for women offered. These versions have slimmer heel sections, lower instep, and a carved arch for a specific fit. A feature that should be a standard by now.
A feature that made the shoe very comfortable for me, was this little feature in the back of the heel section. These pads are meant to lock the foot in the shoe and avoid slipping. Typically I tie my shoes very loose and this really made a difference to me, especially when running a bit faster.
The natural environment for this shoe is the road. And that’s what the so-called PumaGrip does best. A solid and sturdy rubber provides great traction on non-technical environment. I used this shoes also on lighter and dry trails and had no problems.
Despite the tendency of other running brands to use other expert rubber companies for the outsole material, Puma decided to create their own. The result is a good mix of rubbers that create a great and solid feeling for the ground and a material that appears to last well. I have about 400 kilometers on my pairs and it is astonishing how less wear this shoe has.
While I was training with the Deviate Nitro the last few weeks, some of my training buddies got curious and one of the most asked questions was if this shoe is a racing or training shoe. Until now, I do not really have an appropriate response to this question. The shoe is light, the shoe is speedy, direct on the ground it feels yet very comfortable. Would I race with it? I probably would. Until now I ran the Deviate Nitro during several trainings, from commute runs, long runs to track work and fartleks. I keep loving the shoe for it reliability during all these occasions. Pumas return to proper running shoes suprised me and it will be interesting to see where the brand goes from here.

Tune of the day: Brockhampton – Roadrunner: New Light, New Machine

shoeporn: The North Face – Flight Vectiv

Something that these days is part of the shoe business, is the rumor mill. Since months Alameda, California grounded outdoor powerhouse The North Face, was set to drop a carbon plated shoe. Well, it seems that all major shoe corporations are on the outlook to apprise their respective top range models with this technology. But suddenly it was a brand that is not necessarily known for its shoe building skills, that joined the hype.
Since 1968 The North Face distribute and produce outdoor equipment. It all started with climbing gear and then grew into a brought variety of accessories, clothing and footwear. Personally, I have tested more than a few of their off-road running shoes in the past. Although their jackets, vests, caps and technical gear have been a stable in my wardrobe over the last decade, none of the shoes have majorly impressed me and it seems that technical clothing was more the focus then suitable footwear. Now they released a performance oriented trail running shoe that goes by the name of Flight Vectiv, merging a 3 D carbon fiber footplate, midsole rocker geometry and SurfaceCTRL grip into the first trail specific shoe using the prominet carbon technique.
I had a chance to spot the Flight Vectiv last April as Spaniard and The North Face athlete Pau Capell wore the shoe throughout the 2020 version of the Fjällmaraton around Åre, Sweden where he came 2nd in the 100 kilometer distance. Pau was part of the development process of the Vectiv equipment range and mostly this shoe. TNFs VP of Global Footwear, Jean Marc Djian aimed high when the company took on this project. The company recognized that another try into the footwear market had to be an innovative and exciting.
The Flight Vectiv is the top model of the novel TNF shoe assortment. It is the one shoe that contains full-length carbon plate combined with a rocker geometry. This combination is intended to upsurge the energy return and I was more than keen to see how this mix turned out in a shoe that is intended to be used off the road, a setting where the carbon technology is more to be seen in up-to-date shoe releases. On the picture above some details of the carbon plate are teased on the external.
Even though the sock-like silhouette of the shoe looked like a pleasing feature, I was quite staggered how rigid it was to get into the shoe. The opening is rather small and that undoubtedly created some matters to me. As soon as you’ve entered the shoe, there is not a tense sensitivity. It just appears that the entering part of the shoe is pretty close-fitting. After a while I got used to it and know how to enter as the reinforced, breathable-knit upper is pretty strechable. Running this shoe throughout wintertime, I have the feeling that the body-hugging fitting also stops all sorts of muck to enter the inside. To me something that is very helpful particularly with the heavy use of salt and sand on the local streets. Frequently the small particles find a way to enter a shoe. Not so in this one. Generally the one piece upper that is elasticated and hugs your upper foot and ankle is super nice and fits around the foot like a glove.
With the Flight Vectiv, The North Face planned a shoe for the longer and ultra-distances. The company paid attention to durable ingredients such as kevlar, polyamide and matryx materials that they also tested and used in other equipment. This time it seems that The North Face was able to familiarize their extensive knowledge from mountain equipment into footgear. The Flight Vectiv is an overall quality shoe that is very well made. Till now I spend somewhat over 100 kilometers in this shoe and I’m constantly surprised how it tackles different grounds and weather situations. The picture shows the 3D-molded heel counter for a better fit, another nice detail in a well build shoe with a quality finish.
There were times when The North Face allowed their sponsored athletes to use different shoes and switch from their very own models to the ones that the competition offered. This has clearly changed now with the new shoe range. Several athletes have been smashing FKT’s last year. One of my favorite runs has been the record setting Grand Canyon R2R2R-alt FKT effort by TNF legends Mike Foote and Rob Krar. Check their video here. Time for these two to tackle some SwimRun competitions i guess.
Without a doubt, the climax of this shoe must be the so-called 3D Vectiv plate. It offers momentum and in combination with the stability Rocker shape, the foot placement is optimized. The shoe is not super soft as many other carbon running shoes, but this is something that aims the runner while running on technical ground. At the start it feels like the shoe is rigid as it does not provide much flexibly, especially to the sites. Although it feels stable and the feel for the ground is certainly given. Officially The North Face labels the Vectiv technology as “revolutionary soling architecture.” Fundamentally what they are describing are the layers beneath the feet. These are all the different foams and treads that work together to deliver a cushioned, safe and springy sensation.
Despite the fact there is a lot of advanced and new material that has been incorporated in this shoe, the outsole is known from previous models. Grip on wet and dry terrain has been the attention in the development procedure. If you expect a super aggressive and “deep” outsole, you will be dissatisfied. The lugs are well and smartly placed but come in with 3.5 mm which is not a standard in trail shoes. After some sketchy situations, the design and traction really grew on me. To me it is a great mix of traction and control. The lugs are places in proper distance and that means that snow, dirt, or whatever sticky stuff you encounter, will not get stuck. I try to break in shoes on the treadmill. Until now, this tradition has never been used with trail shoes. It was different with the Flight Vectiv. It certainly is a versatile sole.
A detailed look at the outsole construction that protects the 6 mm toe-to-heel offset. This shoe facilitated 14 North Face sponsored athletes to set FKTs wearing different Vectiv prototypes during a nearly race free 2020.
To me, the Flight Vectiv delivers a high level of comfort and proper cushioning that still allows to feel the ground but not the pounding. Combined with the securely sensation of the sock-fit paired with a minor, cushioned padding at the upper heel region, this shoe ensures thoroughgoing comfort and support.
Throughout the punitive dark and slushy time of the year and now, when all the lovely white stuff is about to dissolve, this shoe has really gotten to me. It’s fun to run due to the pleasant and well thought cushion, the ground feeling is excellent and joint with a well-planned outsole, it generates a certain security during the cold season. I ran the shoe a lot on icy and wintry streets but also took it around the local, technical, trail system. I get to treasure a well thought out shoe that I never saw coming from The North Face. Having run plenty of carbon-based road running shoes, I really valued this innovative tactic and the way it was shifted into a running shoe aimed to hit he paths. It can be discussed if it makes sense to issue a trail shoe that has a white upper, but at the end I felt it was enjoyable that the daily run was able to produce the color line. A very philosophical slant to this debate, I know. Its some sort of a minimalistic approach, even from the design. Typically trail shoes do look a bit unlike. The Flight Vectiv seems more like a road shoe. Yet, I have the feeling the shoe will continue in my daily rotation for a bit longer.

Tune of the day: Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth – It’s Not a Game (Instrumental Version)

Read of the day: Cathal Dennehy: Welcome to the age of the super shoes

shoeporn: Merrell – All Out Crush Light

Back in 1981, two directors for the Rossignol ski enterprise, Clark Matis and John Schweizer joint forces with Randy J. Merrell. Merrell had been manufacturing vastly celebrated custom hiking boots. Quite some amount of shoes has been build and sold over the past few years. All sorts of outdoor shoes can be found in the current Merrell catalogue. Their hottest onset is called “All Out Crush Light”. Another highlight to their rising off-road jogging battery.
Breathable netting paired with pleasant TPU and woven fabric upper makes for a comfy fitting and a smart exterior. The “All Out Crush Light” is a super flexible shoe. That does not mean you can bend the shoe all around. It means the shoe is pretty adjustable to diverse exteriors. An elastic upper makes up for this distinct touch and creates a dynamic feeling on the trails and on the road.
Merrell bids a pretty trustworthy under foot guard named “TrailProtect”. Notwithstanding eluding the significance of a sensation for the ground, a unfailing defence versus harsh natural disturbs is well incorporated.
Did you ever smash a stone or a rock while cruising around the trails? Well, I wear US 13 so it is pretty likeable I do get some knocks here and there. The shielding toe cap safed me some blue toenails.
Quick data: A courteous 6mm Drop beside a 5mm lug elevation. These specifics paired with a springy sole and some responsive soft foam make for a balanced trail shoe.
I enjoyed the tangible rubber outsole of the “All Out Crush”. It performed very reliable on all sorts of paths and throughout different types of weather. Besides the pleasant off-road performance the sole does also offer decent comfort on tarmac. The UniFly Midsole is a great comfort midsole and the heart of this shoe.
218 grams is not much for a shoe with such characters. It enhances to the vibrant impression while running Merrell’s latest lightweight cannonball throughout its speeds. A exciting all-rounder.
A good looking and fast Trail shoe. Alongside a 99,95 € retail price the “All Out Crush Light” occurs to be a well-thought-of and economically priced trail shoe option.
Heaps of smart features makes that shoe stick out. Certain facings do also feature highly shimmering outer material . An exciting feature during night runs.
A prosperous adding to the off-road running portion in the novel Merrell catalogue – the “All Out Crush Light”

All pictures (c) runssel

shoeporn: Mizuno – Wave Rider 19

The Wave Rider already is a Mizuno classic. Now issuing its 19th (!) edition this is the up-to-date version of this well-liked neutral kick. Looking back a couple of years, I jogged one of the elder styles of the Wave Rider. I recall the shoe to be a fabulous light training shoe, which I used for marathon tempo runs and normal training runs. Then I picked up this version. I was keen to sense the transformation throughout the years. 
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It is pretty apparent that this is a quality made shoe.  Specifically the upper sock liner is effectively designed, smooth and decently soft. While the underfoot feel is a bit stiff the overall flexibly is great. I ran the shoe on longer workouts and during track sessions. Although the Wave Rider is direct, snug and smooth it still delivers sufficient cushion to guarantee a sensitivity that generates a lot of enjoyment while working out properly.

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A smooth design is significant. The 19th version of the Wave Rider looks great. Mizuno reorganized the upper style with additional resilience and shock attenuation. This increases foot comfort throughout the run.

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Mizuno’s Parallel Wave technology is a widespread characteristic with the Japanese company. It is designed to integrate more firmness into their models. Unlike the rest of the shoe brands, Mizuno uses a grade of foam thickness to generate stability. Basically there is plastic material that runs along the forefoot and the heel for best foot control. The sprightly U4ic midsole together with the corresponding wave technology comforts a bouncy approachable strike and gusted rubber in the forefoot area offers durability and softness.

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Mizuno’s existing Runbird was revealed for the first time at the 1988 Seoul Olympics when Carl Lewis and Florence Griffith Joyner won gold medals wearing Mizuno shoes.

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Nope. The Wave Rider is undeniably not a stability shoe. Although the Wave Plate in the forefoot portion offers some light assistance for the foot, there is not much stability seen anyplace else. The set-up offers a firm, fast ride and a stiff heel counter.

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With the 19th style the Wave Rider appears to have a bit more midsole material then preceding models. Furthermore the upper got an excellent re-design. Although the toe box seems a bit sloppier, it is very accommodating for wider feet.

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A mere of 229 grams is not that much for such a playful and comfortable shoe. I treasured this shoe throughout faster tempo track tests and speed workouts – a boundless all-rounder.

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The so-called “Blown rubber” in the forefoot area surges cushioning and responsiveness. Flex Controllers placed in high flex areas on the outsole act as miniature wave plates for increased flexibility and reduced weight!

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Mizuno calls its outside rubber “X10”. It is located in the heel and is created of robust carbon rubber for boosted traction

All pictures (c) RUNssel

#shoeporn: Haglöfs Gram XC

Swedish outdoor enterprise Haglöfs is not really a trademark you would associate with foot gear. Since a couple of years they build some pretty nice alpine and hiking shoes besides their key range of clothing. Recently they paired up with Japanese footwear powerhouse Asics to please the booming trail running market. The distinguishing presence of their main model Gram XC is nothing to oversee. This shoe is red. Just red. Funky.

Appearance is a lot for me when it comes to running shoes. If I don’t like the look of a shoe I would not really use it. Indubitably taste is something that is interpreted in a lot of special ways. For me this shoe looks good. I like the shape of the shoe and the little gimmicks that come with it. It is well build and pleases the eye with its individual monochrome design. Something new in a very special way.

It is raining and storming when I lace up the Gram XC to go out in the forest for a test ride. The first couple of kilometers lead me past the local farm roads and through grass tracks. The shoe feels solid on tarmac. Sometimes trail soles feels awkward running on normal, even ground. This one is a bit unalike. The lightness of the shoe is a main feature according to the product information. Yes, the shoe is light but not any different to comparable models. It feels good and for a shoe with this amount of cushion it certainly is not heavy.

Just when I take a sharp turn into a soaky grass trail I get to feel a nice feature this shoe has to offer. The grip is pretty awesome for a sole of that style. A very sweet foam mixture of the sole and the shape makes it nice to move aggressively in corners and on technical trails. A very responsive feeling is something you really appreciate with this shoe. I continued on some slippy trails through the local forest. Hurdled some trees and cruised along rock sections that generally make a road running shoe scream. Not so the Gram XC. Very straightforward performance by this guy.

I continue to wonder about the flexibility of the Gram XC and certainly feel that this shoe obviously does have a Rock Protection in the AHAR (Asics High Abrasion Resistance) sole, as I land on some sharp gravels. The Asics Gel system nevertheless works nice and for a forefoot runner like me the cushioning is well placed in that shoe. As always I could do with a bit less plastic on the back. After running the shoe for a couple of weeks now I have to say that the sole material looks pretty “run down” at some parts. Something that other shoes in my rack don’t.

As you will see the pictures the Gram XC has some mesh covering the lacking. They say it is a ‘lace pocket’. I could not really fit the laces in there, as it is cut way to short and rigid. I tried it twice but lost the interest in that feature pretty fast. Other then this feature it is a nice protection against rocks and sand. Not so against water and rain. I found the shoe to get soaked pretty fast. Even with light rain and misty trails. The lacing system does come across a bit thin but feels good and holds the feet in a secure position. Also the cut of the shoe in the back gives a nice and secure feeling and all kind of undergrounds.

So did I like this shoe? I certainly did. Despite being a shoe designed for trails and off-road running the Gram XC pleased me on all king of terrains and weather conditions. It is a nice and well build all-day training shoe. For me the highlight is the sole and the way it supports you and keeps you on track. I’m exited to see what Haglöfs has on offer for the next round of trail running models. The start was ok. Lets see what the future holds.

Assessment Centre

Shoes
Brooks – Ghost 6
Brooks – PureGrit 2
Brooks – PureDrift
Brooks – Adrenaline ASR 10
Brooks – PureConnect
Brooks – T7 Racer
Ecco – Biom Ultra GTX
Haglöfs – Gram XC
Haglöfs L.I.M Low
Haglöfs – Gram Comp II 
Altra – Adam
Adidas – Adizero Adios Boost
Salomon S-LAB Sense Ultra
Skechers – Go Run 2
Skechers – GoRun 4
Dynafit – MS Feline Superlight


Dynafit – Feline SL
La Sportiva – Anakonda
Nike – Streak XC 3
Scarpa – Minima
Mizuno – Wave Catalyst 
Mizuno – Wave Rider 19
Mizuno – Wave Kazan 2
Hoka One One – Vanquish 2
Hoka One One – Speedgoat
Hoka One One – Clifton 2
Hoka One One – Huaka
Merrell – All Out Crush Light 
Merrell – All Out Charge
Merrell – Bare Access 4
Nike Zoom Terra Kiger 3
2016 Running Shoe Highlights
New Balance – 1600V2 Spikeless

Gear
Anton Krupicka Signature Collection Short and Vest + Headband
Philips SHQ3200 
Jabra Sport Wireless+ Bluetooth Headset
Oakley Frogskins
yurbuds Ironman Inspire Pro
GoPro Hero3
Limar Ultralight+ Road
Ass Savers
SKINS – A200 Compression Long Tights
Haglöfs – Essens III Hooded Down Jacket
My Tour du Mont Blanc gear
Bellroy – Elements Sleeve
Thoni Mara
Norrøna – fjørå flex1 Shorts and aero100 Jacket
Norröna – Bitihorn dri1 jacket
New Balance – Ultra Hooded Jacket

Books
Steve Chilton – It’s a hill, get over it!
Sean Kelly – Hunger
Paul Kimmage – Rough Ride
Charlie Spedding – From last to first
It’s the limit (Fanzine)

SwimRun Wetsuits
Zone3 Evolution SwimRun wetsuit

Island to island – ÖTILLÖ

It was just too mesmerizing, too baffling and way to appealing.

What started a few years ago with viscous interchange of video clips and articles terminated in a simple and to the point merit application to Anders Malm and the Utö brothers. Since yesterday we know that we are a part of it in this years edition. Team number 35 “German Sparkle Party”!

“Take it easy, but take it.” Woody Guthrie

We extensively discussed this appreciation through training sessions and over certain beers. We both agreed that this is simply outlandish and absurd. But we eternally knew – This one is particular and highly motivating.

On the 1st of September 2014 we eventually will reach Utö MÅL. After 10 kilometers of swimming and 65 kilometers of running Fabian and I will know what it means to be part of “one of the toughest endurance races in the world” – the ÖTILLÖ

Picture: ÖTILLÖ

#shoeporn: Salomon S-LAB Sense Ultra

#shoeporn: Brooks – Adrenaline ASR 10

It is not an easygoing mission to find the accurate shoe for this kind of damp and rainy climate. You never really know what to expect when you go out for a run these days in the middle of Europe. The day-to-day training bounces amongst dull roads, misty forest paths, muddy farm-tracks and your splashed home-grown single trail.

Most of the time I’m just so impatient to go out running that I simply do not want to think about the shoe I’m going to wear. Unquestionably in summer it does not really matter what you wear. The difficulties and undergrounds do not ask for to much during daily exercise. Suddenly in wintertime this changes. Not only to the best.

So when you jog along in the early morning or evenings you need some comrade out there. You need somebody who can do it all. Someone who is an “a jack of all trades”. Just call it an “a jack of all tracks” – the polymath of running. Let’s call it: Adrenaline ASR 10

It is not the first time I run this shoe and it surely wont be the last. In this kind of season he is man. The Adrenaline comes with a humble but efficient and well positioned „MoGo“- cushion that still give you enough sensation for the environment your leaping past. Together with the new outside that features the well-known Gore- Tex Membrane nothing really speaks against this shoe.

With the 10th version Brooks still opted the game for this role-model that set the standard. Merged with this new ADR sole. Well, they created a true polymath for daily running training.

#shoeporn: Dynafit – MS Feline Superlight



Dynafit is not a brand you unmistakably associate with running. Dynafit’s home-base are the alps. Since the 1950 the Austrian firm devoted all their drive into proper ski equipment. Today they are still going strong with constant development and a quality range of ski touring and mountaineering equipment. In 2012 they also learned that there is a summer season. Their mountain knowledge got bundled into a small but fine trail running range. The highlight of this range is clearly the Feline. I’m not sure if the shoe is named after the 1983 The Stranglers studio album but it certainly has the funk…
Lets get started with the optical appearance. Style is everything they say. I’m not the biggest fan of the look. The Feline glances a bit gawky and not really dynamic. The massive sole and the huge upper make the shoe look weighty and slowish. Maybe I’m too used to “normal” looking models and I need more time with this one but the look definitely calls for underestimation in my eyes.
There are numerous nice features, which makes this shoe distinct and attention-grabbing. Just when you lace her up funky “Pull before flight” backstrap demands a reckless off-piste jog. Seeing the snow leopard at the front is like the figurehead of a combat ship.
Once you pick up the shoe the compact look changes into incredible lightness. The mere of 270 gramm of this piece positively surprised me. Also the very stiff and solid image changed all of a sudden and puts a smile in my face. I get changed and head out for a run. I want to feel the lightness first hand. Or lets say, first feet I guess. Whatsoever.
I love running in new shoes. And I dislike being saddened by one. In this case the Feline made me pretty content. As the rain got lighter I hit the local vineyards in the pursue for a precipitous and slippery uphill section. Running on the road the shoe feels good. Not remarkable but that is clearly not the setting this piece of equipment needs to be run in. For a shoe of this grace the sole technology seems to me pretty extraordinary. A proper cushion, which I usually experienced in way heavier shoes, combined with a pretty stable structure seems to be the real deal here. Clearly the massive Vibram sole is the attention grabber from a visual point of view. Where I lack the understatement from the visual side, I truly enjoy the performance from the running side of things.
As I travel past some drainy and soaky paths I hit the first rocky part of my little test loop. Occasionally when I take a new shoe for a rendezvous I’m anxious what this first part will be like. Especially a light shoe like this could potentially cause some difficulties. Nonetheless I look forward as I’m wondering that now water is entering this shoe. I just underestimated a puddle. My socks are still dry. This upper mesh protection thingy works, happy with that so.
The first gaits on the rocky part are amazing. What can I say? The traction on wet and spikey rocks is insane. Insane in a way that you feel the ground but in a positive way. The traction is there and the feeling for the underground stays real all the time. I jog on and the shoe makes me care less and less about the underground. I have to jump over a tree and head on to a less rocky trail that’s winding beside the small river. The sandy and muddy terrain is like running on the road compared to the rocks I was facing earlier on. The shoe and I get the chill and I’m already looking forward to a leafy downhill I haven’t run for a long time.
The forest footpath continues and the shoe keeps me on track. Sometimes I feel that the sole is a bit too high for me. Clearly this piece is not a minimal runner but the high sole makes me feel to far away from the ground. This should change after running more often.
Just a couple of meters ahead the downhill starts. Recently I tackled it with the mountain bike and I know that this is undoubtedly the most challenging time of the year to go down there. Perfect for a test so. I try to increase the speed and give it everything on the decent. The Feline seems to be pretty happy with what he faces. All sorts of twits and underground he faces during this downhill seem to be a task he can accomplish. The profile combined with the good and solid rubber does have an answer. Boxed ticked.
It starts back drizzling when I leave the forest. The puddles along the road fill up with more water and I try to wash off the dirt from the shoe as I drag him through every pond that’s available. Usually this ends pretty early as the socks get to wet. Today I’m amazed that even the last puddle gets a proper check from the Feline. When I stop in front of the house the shoe is clean. So are my socks. The rest of the equipment isn’t. Great run. Great shoe.



























Tune of the day: Misanthrop – Deadlock 

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