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shoeporn: Adidas – UltraBOOST 21

Herzogenaurach’s three stripes company just released the state-of-the-art renovation of their popular UltraBOOST series. There is possibly no shoe in the assortment that feature so much of adidas’ soft and springy Boost material then this one. In addition to the iconic three lines, the material has been a trademark for adidas running shoes since its very first release in 2013. I had the chance to test one of the first pairs, the Adizero Adios Boost, back then. Check the Post if you are interested.

With the UltraBOOST series adidas has been surfing amid the so called “lifestyle” and “performance” segment. There are no two opinions about the look, that is for sure. Nonetheless we will concentrate on the performance part of things in this post.
As mentioned earlier on, the boost material is a trademarked polymer exclusively used by adidas. Basically, it is a lot of small balls which are compressed and molded to protect the foot from the ground and it delivers a certain boost while toeing off during the running movement. The small balls contain of patented thermoplastic urethane. Adidas cooperated with the German chemical powerhouse BASF (Hello Steffen 😉) to create this material.
Adidas did not hold back with the usage of the boost material. Particularly at the back end of the shoe. At first the Boost material was only known within the running scene, but when a certain Kanye Omari West was seen wearing a pair of UltraBOOST “Triple White” in 2015, the shoes went mainstream and not only boosted running strides but also sales.
The three stripes are an iconic characteristic that defines Adidas. At first the brand added the stripes to its running shoes to make them sturdier. One of the initial T&F athletes to use the shoes with the stripes was legendary Jesse Owens in the 1936 Summer Olympics. By now, the stripes on the clover symbol represent Adidas focus on variety. Finnish brand Karhu and Adidas used to share the three stripes but Adi Dassler bought the rights in 1952.
Comfort undoubtedly is a key feature with this shoe. The upper feels super pleasant and comfortable. The pattern on the side of the shoe make sure that enough stability is provided. I like the sock-like design and the wide flexible fit around the forefoot. The Ultraboost 21 upper is made from flexible Primeknit material and is only 1.9mm thick. Compared to a traditional upper, this really feels like a sock.
The last 7 years, the Boost material was a stable when it comes to cushioning. Several models have proofed this. Notwithstanding the age, the material is still good and certainly does the trick when it comes to the padding part. The energy return was lacking in previous models and adidas successfully changed this with this model and the newly developed LEP Torsion System. The Torsion system is something that can been seen in older models but adidas changed it quite a bit and added the flexible TPU fork to increase the toe off.
A new standard is the Continental rubber that is used on the outsole of the shoe. Its durable and grips pretty well.
Two german tradional companies unite. Continental was founded in 1871 as a rubber producer and still is strong in this segment producing all kinds of tires and car equipment.
It is no top-secret that the Ultraboost 21 is not the lightest shoe. With a weight of nearly 380 grams in my US13 model it is weighty for its standard. Nevertheless, it doesn’t feel super heavy or unsmooth while running. The feeling was normal and I never felt I have to invest more energy then I essentially got out of the shoe. According to adidas, the Boost foam in this shoe is now firmer. This should result 20% more responsiveness.
A close up shot highlighting the Primeknit upper that is made of yarn from recycled plastic bottles.
It looks like the heel is one gigantic portion of Boost foam with one major drop. With 10mm, it is not that huge at the end. The heel foam is wrinkled around the cup of the heel and produces a setup that allows the foot to sit securely inside the midsole. This is a major change to the previous version, the Ultraboost ST.
To me the Ultraboost 21 is a daily milage grinder. I really treasure the fit and the padding it offers. I use this shoe on a daily basis to get the base miles in the tank. I like the fit the reliability of the boost material that certainly doesn’t disappoint. With the arrival of the Lightstrike and Lightstrike Pro material it will be exitng to see what the future holds for this modell range. Boost is the heaviest of the current three Adidas performance foams and it will be interesting to see how the brand develops or include these materials further.

Tune of the day: Fred The Godson – Garcias
YouTube of the day: Kengo Suzuki’s 2:04:56 National Record to Win Final Lake Biwa Mainichi
Pod of the day: Tommy Hughes joins the Spring Snyggt Podcast (Start at 53 Minutes)

shoeporn: The North Face – Flight Vectiv

Something that these days is part of the shoe business, is the rumor mill. Since months Alameda, California grounded outdoor powerhouse The North Face, was set to drop a carbon plated shoe. Well, it seems that all major shoe corporations are on the outlook to apprise their respective top range models with this technology. But suddenly it was a brand that is not necessarily known for its shoe building skills, that joined the hype.
Since 1968 The North Face distribute and produce outdoor equipment. It all started with climbing gear and then grew into a brought variety of accessories, clothing and footwear. Personally, I have tested more than a few of their off-road running shoes in the past. Although their jackets, vests, caps and technical gear have been a stable in my wardrobe over the last decade, none of the shoes have majorly impressed me and it seems that technical clothing was more the focus then suitable footwear. Now they released a performance oriented trail running shoe that goes by the name of Flight Vectiv, merging a 3 D carbon fiber footplate, midsole rocker geometry and SurfaceCTRL grip into the first trail specific shoe using the prominet carbon technique.
I had a chance to spot the Flight Vectiv last April as Spaniard and The North Face athlete Pau Capell wore the shoe throughout the 2020 version of the Fjällmaraton around Åre, Sweden where he came 2nd in the 100 kilometer distance. Pau was part of the development process of the Vectiv equipment range and mostly this shoe. TNFs VP of Global Footwear, Jean Marc Djian aimed high when the company took on this project. The company recognized that another try into the footwear market had to be an innovative and exciting.
The Flight Vectiv is the top model of the novel TNF shoe assortment. It is the one shoe that contains full-length carbon plate combined with a rocker geometry. This combination is intended to upsurge the energy return and I was more than keen to see how this mix turned out in a shoe that is intended to be used off the road, a setting where the carbon technology is more to be seen in up-to-date shoe releases. On the picture above some details of the carbon plate are teased on the external.
Even though the sock-like silhouette of the shoe looked like a pleasing feature, I was quite staggered how rigid it was to get into the shoe. The opening is rather small and that undoubtedly created some matters to me. As soon as you’ve entered the shoe, there is not a tense sensitivity. It just appears that the entering part of the shoe is pretty close-fitting. After a while I got used to it and know how to enter as the reinforced, breathable-knit upper is pretty strechable. Running this shoe throughout wintertime, I have the feeling that the body-hugging fitting also stops all sorts of muck to enter the inside. To me something that is very helpful particularly with the heavy use of salt and sand on the local streets. Frequently the small particles find a way to enter a shoe. Not so in this one. Generally the one piece upper that is elasticated and hugs your upper foot and ankle is super nice and fits around the foot like a glove.
With the Flight Vectiv, The North Face planned a shoe for the longer and ultra-distances. The company paid attention to durable ingredients such as kevlar, polyamide and matryx materials that they also tested and used in other equipment. This time it seems that The North Face was able to familiarize their extensive knowledge from mountain equipment into footgear. The Flight Vectiv is an overall quality shoe that is very well made. Till now I spend somewhat over 100 kilometers in this shoe and I’m constantly surprised how it tackles different grounds and weather situations. The picture shows the 3D-molded heel counter for a better fit, another nice detail in a well build shoe with a quality finish.
There were times when The North Face allowed their sponsored athletes to use different shoes and switch from their very own models to the ones that the competition offered. This has clearly changed now with the new shoe range. Several athletes have been smashing FKT’s last year. One of my favorite runs has been the record setting Grand Canyon R2R2R-alt FKT effort by TNF legends Mike Foote and Rob Krar. Check their video here. Time for these two to tackle some SwimRun competitions i guess.
Without a doubt, the climax of this shoe must be the so-called 3D Vectiv plate. It offers momentum and in combination with the stability Rocker shape, the foot placement is optimized. The shoe is not super soft as many other carbon running shoes, but this is something that aims the runner while running on technical ground. At the start it feels like the shoe is rigid as it does not provide much flexibly, especially to the sites. Although it feels stable and the feel for the ground is certainly given. Officially The North Face labels the Vectiv technology as “revolutionary soling architecture.” Fundamentally what they are describing are the layers beneath the feet. These are all the different foams and treads that work together to deliver a cushioned, safe and springy sensation.
Despite the fact there is a lot of advanced and new material that has been incorporated in this shoe, the outsole is known from previous models. Grip on wet and dry terrain has been the attention in the development procedure. If you expect a super aggressive and “deep” outsole, you will be dissatisfied. The lugs are well and smartly placed but come in with 3.5 mm which is not a standard in trail shoes. After some sketchy situations, the design and traction really grew on me. To me it is a great mix of traction and control. The lugs are places in proper distance and that means that snow, dirt, or whatever sticky stuff you encounter, will not get stuck. I try to break in shoes on the treadmill. Until now, this tradition has never been used with trail shoes. It was different with the Flight Vectiv. It certainly is a versatile sole.
A detailed look at the outsole construction that protects the 6 mm toe-to-heel offset. This shoe facilitated 14 North Face sponsored athletes to set FKTs wearing different Vectiv prototypes during a nearly race free 2020.
To me, the Flight Vectiv delivers a high level of comfort and proper cushioning that still allows to feel the ground but not the pounding. Combined with the securely sensation of the sock-fit paired with a minor, cushioned padding at the upper heel region, this shoe ensures thoroughgoing comfort and support.
Throughout the punitive dark and slushy time of the year and now, when all the lovely white stuff is about to dissolve, this shoe has really gotten to me. It’s fun to run due to the pleasant and well thought cushion, the ground feeling is excellent and joint with a well-planned outsole, it generates a certain security during the cold season. I ran the shoe a lot on icy and wintry streets but also took it around the local, technical, trail system. I get to treasure a well thought out shoe that I never saw coming from The North Face. Having run plenty of carbon-based road running shoes, I really valued this innovative tactic and the way it was shifted into a running shoe aimed to hit he paths. It can be discussed if it makes sense to issue a trail shoe that has a white upper, but at the end I felt it was enjoyable that the daily run was able to produce the color line. A very philosophical slant to this debate, I know. Its some sort of a minimalistic approach, even from the design. Typically trail shoes do look a bit unlike. The Flight Vectiv seems more like a road shoe. Yet, I have the feeling the shoe will continue in my daily rotation for a bit longer.

Tune of the day: Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth – It’s Not a Game (Instrumental Version)

Read of the day: Cathal Dennehy: Welcome to the age of the super shoes

shoeporn: New Balance – 1500 V2 (Team NB Elite edition)

224 grams of running flat beauty – with the second revise of the firstly in 2015 launched 1500 series; prominent Boston based footwear makers New Balance provides an terrific and elegant shoe for wholesome and loose running.
The first issue of the 1500 series received raving reviews. Still New Balance included the athlete response and shaped a shoe that could be described as a perfect distance racing shoe. The 1500 in its second version comes up with light pronation stability as well as just about the right amount of cushioning that a running shoe of this style requires.
The special “Team NB Elite edition” looks extravagant with its “Bright Cherry” colour scheme. Pretty difficult to oversee. Naturally style is matter of personal favour. Personally I like the look of the new 1500 v2. That is how a racing flat should look like.
Sebastian Kienle, 2014 Ironman World Champ, wore the first version of the 1500 when he won the iconic event on Hawaii’s big island. Subsequently he was instrumental in the development of this shoe. Till now this is his racing shoe when it comes to Ironman distance racing.
Getting low – the general drop comes in at 6mm. Other hard facts are a 22mm heel height and 16mm on the forefoot. Proper racing style!
However the crash pad of the outsole still remains the same as seen in the first version, the design got altered a bit by the New Balance designers. Whilst they used tiny rubber cruxes in the previous model there are now some sort of triangular formed lugs. I took the shoe through its paces while running on the roads, gravel and on the track. I like the grip, no changes when it comes to ground control and general feel.
An inside look – The 1500 V2 bids added padding in the middle of the sole to care for runners with pronation troubles. While the shoe is light and meant for racing this could be a bonus for runners that are generally struggling with lightweight racing flats. Still the support is light that the extra “T-Beam” technology offers. The lightweight TPU shaft is built to provide torsional stability arch support through a middle beam design.
 “REVlite” is the title of the foam mixture that is used as the base of the shoe. The lightweight composition bids excellent and springy underfoot cushioning which I really valued.
Besides a tacky design the greatly centred heel-to-toe cavity supports the runner to achieve a straightforward and precise ride as the shoe is stabilised.
More specifics of the firm outsole and the certain lug-designs.
A key factor for the steadfast and supportive ride that this shoe offers is the “REVlite” sole.
Front end – New Balance reorganised the start of the lacing and built-in a petite holder in the centre of the bottom end of the shoe.
Pretty much like his predecessor the V2 comes in with a snug and well-made no-sew layers finish that is called “FantomFit”. A lot of racing flats are designed very narrow in the toe box area. Not so with this one. NB gives the forefoot plenty of space.
The foremost revise to the first version of the 1500 – a sock-like tongue support that keeps everything in check and creates a very comfy and precise feeling while striding.

With the revise of the 1500 NB raised the bar when it comes to running flats. Whilst the latest model supports a direct stride it still has some decent and well located cushioning. Something that hasn’t been seen within such a style of shoes. I really became a fan of this one. Still I don’t know why the up-to-the-minute model is a little bit heavier then the first version?

Tune of the day: Aidan Baker and Tomas Järmyr – Werl I

sneakerporn: Mizuno – Wave Ekiden 10

I do not really memorize which version, but the Wave Ekiden was my very first road-flat quite some years ago. From the time when then I got my first pair until now, I raced several pairs of this modern road-running classic. It is not only a shiny and fast looking shoe, it is also a superior racing flat I loved every time I got my hand on one. Now Mizuno released the 10th version. Lets have a close look.
The term “Ekiden” is something that should be well-known to all running fans across the globe. It refers to a long-distance relay running race, typically on roads. The Japanese term originally referred to a post-horse or stagecoach which transmitted communication by stages.
Mizuno calls the outsole by the name of “G3“. It is merely created for road running and bids just enough charge for reckless excursions on the cemented underground or track workouts. For a humble and slick get-up it latest quite some time when I used the shoe through numerous trainings and road interval sessions.
Personally I always enjoyed the fitting of the Ekiden. The elegant and thin upper creates a comfortable and close fit and makes running fast a controlled experience.
It is called “X10” and its job is to ensure stability and traction. The durable Mizuno carbon rubber allows for longer wear in high impact areas and provides more traction.
“U4ic” is the name of the midsole compound providing high comfort and performance, while being extremely lightweight.
The height of accurate racing expertise is found in this Japanese heritage shoe.
Unconquerable – the pure beauty of a simple running flat.
The polite 6mm offset bids a  fast and very responsive ride.
All pictures show the Mizuno Wave Ekiden in the Diva Blue, White and Safety Yellow colour line. Mizuno sticks to the characteristic design.
All my dear reader please note: This shoe does not have a lot of cushioning you consequently need to be able to have some experience running a shoe like this. The minimalist design does not offer much and feet and legs might need to work more. It is a pure racing shoe that follows the minimal route.
Mizuno’s 10th version of the Wave Ekiden bids minimal underfoot support which is desired to run fast and efficient. With a total weight of sweet 145g the shoe offers no arch support either. 
Once more I was delighted to have a go with this classic. Mizuno delivers once more as the only update their road-racing flagship insignificant. Why change a running system?

All pictures (c) Runssel

Shoeporn: Scarpa – Atom (Orange Fluo)

Scarpa is on the move. On the move to further increase and improve their quality alpinist inventions. Since years the Italians are a household name when it comes to high-quality off-road outdoor equipment. Particularly the footwear union is widely recognized and highly popular among hikers, mountaineers, alpinist or Skimo competitors.

The rapid chunk of mountain and off-road undertakings have been overlooked for some time. Last year’s running shoe collection (Already I reviewed the Minima) was an exciting starter to the lighter efforts of alpine travels. With the latest signing of well-known athlete, photographer and outdoor novelist Joe Grant, Scarpa puts the emphasis on the thriving trail-running market place. With a three-year contract in its pocket, Grant will be the face to their alpine shoe product line. It will be exciting to see how his contribution will assist the corporation to settle in this market slice.

The up-to-date product pool bids some pretty exciting lightweight and minimal goods. As I was checking the fresh assortment, the Atom caught my full attention. A refined and fast looking minimal piece of foot wear. Not only the flamboyant coloring forms an eye catching shoe, it is also the vigorous 4 mm drop that generates a shoe for quick and direct off-road undertakings.

In addition to the general clean and effective look, the Atom offers some thoughtful details that will appreciated during long and short outings. I ran the Atom through varieties of undergrounds and conditions. While I was training around the Cote d Azur lately, I had the chance to take the Atom from end to end of a variation of challenging undergrounds. Although damp and indulgent forest single-lanes were an laid-back mission, the shaky and technically difficult trails along the rocky coast line were a excessive playground for this model. I was astonished by the performance of the nifty grip the Vibram Genesis Lite outsole offers. The build-in rock platter bids a boundless protection without making the shoe too inflexible.

I still appreciate my excursions with the Atom as the shoe offers great traction that ends in a secure feeling during all sorts of punishing environments. Scarpa marks a move into the correct direction. It is going to be exciting to see what the Italians issue in the future. Their knowledge among mountain shoes is countless. How they will incorporate it into the light and fast style will be interesting to witness. Certainly the new-fangled Atom is a huge move that offers so much delight along the trails.

The low stack height of the Atom is created for steep and technical trails.

The brand name stands for Società Calzaturiera Asolana Riunita Pedemontana Anonima, which means Associated Shoe Manufacturing Company of the Asolo Mountain Area.

The Atom characters a fine and exiting refresh to Scarpa’s mountain running assortment.

Race ready – fused upper material to save weight and increase the comfort!

Hailing from the Montebelluna region in Italy, the company opened their US HQ in Boulder, CO in 2005.

249g of trail running madeness awaits.

The partner for wild outings is the Vibram Genesis Lite sole.

The midsole is made out of Compression Molded EVA and works quite well.

Not only the Orange Fluo painting makes this shoe stand out.

A pretty handy element – A little pocket on the tongue stores away the laces.

All pictures: Runssel

Tune of the day: Exiles beautiful Rework of Adiam’s Runaway Feat. BLU

shoeporn: Mizuno – Wave Catalyst

It is difficult to pick a running-shoe category for this one. With the latest Wave Catalyst, Mizuno just announced a successor for their Wave Elixir Modell. This shoe fulfils the lightweight and up-tempo chunk of their range. Pretty rare for a shoe of that category it features a moderate support for over-pronation. Looking back at the first-born Elixir model, the Mizuno engineers condensed the offset by 2mm. Mizuno used the grown space to renovate the padding, which provides this shoe a great cushioned sensation deprived of loosing a blameless contact to the ground, since very little energy is lost in compression and rebound.
Mizuno shaped a shoe that feels home among athletes gazing for a speedier trainer or tempo run shoe. Without a doubt there is speed in this shoe, but for a model like this it bids further stability, support and construction that a lot of comparable models miss.
The centre of attention is the Mizuno typical wave midsole (A Wave Plate constructed from pebax Rnew). It offers a great fitting and cushion through the heel and midfoot.
The Wave Catalyst is somewhat of a multipurpose, everyday training partner. There are not many shoes around that are that stable and likewise reckless. Mizuno offers great responsiveness with sufficient cushioning.
Pretty trendy – The Wave Catalyst in the “Palace Blue / Safety Yellow” colour theme. Mizuno understands to design characteristic shoes with a unique style.
Heavy-duty – I was astonished by the characteristic of the sole. Knowing the wear and tear sectors of my shoes following some miles of running, this one did not demonstrate too much shred. Mizuno promotes its extraordinary blown rubber to be super robust. Well, it looks like they are spot-on.
Besides the overall performance there are a lot of polite and petite features that make a shoe singular. Mizuno pleasantly incorporated their well-known runbird symbol in the sole.
The well-made compress of the upper material paired with stress-free adjustability of the laces creates a well fitting shoe. There is also plenty of room in the forefoot section without the impact on feet movement. With its 260 grams the shoe has a lot to offer for that weight division.
Robustness – A forceful carbon rubber is the highlight in the back part of the sole. Mizuno calls this rubber part “X10”. It supports the heel-striking runner. As a forefoot and middle foot striker I cannot access that piece. However I value the duration of the sole. Tough material is the backbones to the well-lit and bouncy cushion.
Key component –  The flexible midsole shield provides an well-organized arrangement between the heel the middle part of the foot. It adds a secure sensation to every stride. Well needed with such a low-to-the-ground purpose. Running relaxed and gentle the shoe transports a clammy touch. But this is gone once you get yourself into a more lively and speedier state. The Wave Catalyst starts to deliver a dynamic and steadfast sensitivity with an capable structure that keep the motion in check.

All pictures (c) runssel

Other Mizuno reviews:

Mizuno – Wave Kazan 2
Mizuno – Wave Rider 19
Sneak Peak

shoeporn: Hoka One One – Vanquish 2

Hoka is back with its second version of the neutral Vanquish. More cushioning does not mean more weight. So the new form of the Vanquish happens to be even lighter and offers this characteristic and remarkable sensation of sensitivity combined with an incredibly light performance. With a total weight of 276 grams (size 42) this shoe is considered to be a partner for a smooth gallop.
Gossip has it that Hoka is well known to be pretty narrow. Width-wise I never experienced any difficulties. The Vanquish 2 adds to that impression and offers enough space for my ordinary sized feet.
As usual, the framework design is very distinctive. Not a surprise when it comes to Hoka. A robust two-layer foam shell saves the legs with its dense core construction. It benefits the feet to stay in place without being too inflexible. A foam layer close to the foot delivers cushioning. Foam on the outer assists a robust and agile stride.
Frenchman’s Jean-Luc Diard and Nicolas Mermoud formed Hoka One One with the intention to offer more cushioning paired with a wide and firm stand based on light and durable fabrics. When they searched for a name they came by the Maori expression of “flying over the earth” which means Hoka One One.
A robust, well-muffled sole is the key factor to transport firm support in an active and responsive ride.
A Dual-Layer Midsole Construction that fuses rebound EVA in the body with a cushioned EVA on top, offers customary HOKA ONE ONE Ultrasize cushioning with a bit of extra springy ‘zing’ in the stride.
The images display the Vanquish 2 in the “Grey / Orange Flash” colour theme.
Properly there is not a spookier midsole out there then the one you witness here. Hoka uses the midsole to intensify lateral structure to their produces. This works tremendously well with this exemplary. A feature that makes the brand stands out from the competition. As far as I’m concerned there is not a comparable technique around with the competition.
This shoe is considered for road running and the “Full Ground Contact design” bids a secure feel. In the past the Hoka outsoles caused some light issues as the wear and tear was an problem. Not with this one.
Several geometrical details: Offset: 5 mm, Forefoot: 27 mm, Heel: 32 mm
The Vanquish 2 makes for a great long-distance training shoe – bouncy and reactive. A joy for training crushed up jogging limbs.

Other Hoka One One Reviews:
Hoka One One – Speedgoat
Hoka One One – Huaka
Hoka One One – Clifton 2

All pictures (c) runssel

shoeporn: Merrell – All Out Crush Light

Back in 1981, two directors for the Rossignol ski enterprise, Clark Matis and John Schweizer joint forces with Randy J. Merrell. Merrell had been manufacturing vastly celebrated custom hiking boots. Quite some amount of shoes has been build and sold over the past few years. All sorts of outdoor shoes can be found in the current Merrell catalogue. Their hottest onset is called “All Out Crush Light”. Another highlight to their rising off-road jogging battery.
Breathable netting paired with pleasant TPU and woven fabric upper makes for a comfy fitting and a smart exterior. The “All Out Crush Light” is a super flexible shoe. That does not mean you can bend the shoe all around. It means the shoe is pretty adjustable to diverse exteriors. An elastic upper makes up for this distinct touch and creates a dynamic feeling on the trails and on the road.
Merrell bids a pretty trustworthy under foot guard named “TrailProtect”. Notwithstanding eluding the significance of a sensation for the ground, a unfailing defence versus harsh natural disturbs is well incorporated.
Did you ever smash a stone or a rock while cruising around the trails? Well, I wear US 13 so it is pretty likeable I do get some knocks here and there. The shielding toe cap safed me some blue toenails.
Quick data: A courteous 6mm Drop beside a 5mm lug elevation. These specifics paired with a springy sole and some responsive soft foam make for a balanced trail shoe.
I enjoyed the tangible rubber outsole of the “All Out Crush”. It performed very reliable on all sorts of paths and throughout different types of weather. Besides the pleasant off-road performance the sole does also offer decent comfort on tarmac. The UniFly Midsole is a great comfort midsole and the heart of this shoe.
218 grams is not much for a shoe with such characters. It enhances to the vibrant impression while running Merrell’s latest lightweight cannonball throughout its speeds. A exciting all-rounder.
A good looking and fast Trail shoe. Alongside a 99,95 € retail price the “All Out Crush Light” occurs to be a well-thought-of and economically priced trail shoe option.
Heaps of smart features makes that shoe stick out. Certain facings do also feature highly shimmering outer material . An exciting feature during night runs.
A prosperous adding to the off-road running portion in the novel Merrell catalogue – the “All Out Crush Light”

All pictures (c) runssel

shoeporn: La Sportiva – Helios

The Helios just appeared right on time. As the season got worse and worse, my daily runs got a bit out of control. Snow and frost on the streets and challenging trail situations made up for some dodgy actions while training.

With a fine heel-toe drop of 4mm the Helios could be perceived as the bigger, bulky brother to La Sportiva’s Vertical K trail running shoe. I jogged the Vertical K and treasured the shoe for it’s minimal style and the forceful sole. With the Helios La Sportiva established an additional lightweight (8.1 oz, 231 g) shoe which can be seen as a day-to-day workhorse and light racing shoe for runners who can handle just about the perfect extent of cushioning and nothing more. We are talking about a light and steadfast trail shoe by any means. I found it hard to slow down while cruising the trails with this reliable partner. On muddy trails I found the grips to be utterly astonishing. The inner of the Helios is made up in a sock-like style. Besides a comfortable feeling it helps to pretend from slipping or sliding.

Being a admirer of an minimal approach to shoe design, I have to say that La Sportiva did a fantastic job with the Helios. I used the shoe in rain, snowfall and on dry days, on the road and on the trails. I never was dissatisfied by any means. The comfortable mood stayed with me all the time without loosing the aggressive style and touch for the soil. For me the Helios is a complete training partner and flawless racing shoe for longer trail competitions. Having a wide foot I found this shoe to be a perfect fit. Well done, La Sportiva!

Prego – 231g of italian trail running funk.

HyDrain Mesh on the outside. Feels good.

This sole goes by the name of FriXion. I dont know what it means but i know that it works. Pretty well.

Grip as you need.

Ciao Bella! Another red italian race car?

Straight outta Ziano di Fiemme.

Slick design.

Trail jogging made easy with the Helios.

Checked: Norrøna 29 dri3 Coat

Casual and useful can go together. Since I picked up this exquisite chunk of gear I fell in love with it. The plain simple and hands-on approach is perfectly executed with this coat. The Norwegian gang of Norrona shows how its done properly. Despite considered as a “urban” jacket, the 29 Dri3 Men’s Rain Coat offers a lot more. I took it to the mounts as well as to work. The clean style is great and shows that useful outdoor equipment doesn’t need to have unexciting shapes and mind-numbing colours. The well shaped 2 handwarmer pockets combined with the small chest and back pockets give enough space for all needs and are placed pretty perfect.

The three-layer Dri3 membrane feels great and saved my ass (yes, also that part of the body thanks to the lovely length…) not only during a jaunt to the grocery store but also while hiking in the mountains all day. I also valued the light and flexible material as you can roll this coat up pretty easily and compact.

Norrona shows how to combine style with function.

Little Product Clip

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