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Kategorie: Reviews

shoeporn: Salomon – Index.01

The mix of diverse resources that are used to produce a shoe, often makes it problematic or even impossible to reprocess. The awareness of burning shoes after they have been used was one of the driving forces in Salomon’s footwear development squad when they set out to form a running shoe for the roads that could later be recycled and used for other goods. The first design concepts of the Index.01 looked simple, unique and promising. Finally, it was time to release the end product.
The generous wedge of sole material is a nitrogen-infused, TPU-based foam named INFINIRIDE. The bottom unit of the Index.01 can be milled into small fragments and recycled as soon as the shoe has reached the end of its lifecycle. The sole is comfortable, not too soft and with the rocker geometry does a great job to improve a comfortable stride and swift toe-off.
Setting a mark – generating a full recycle loop entails some more actions. For example, the most environmentally friendly homecoming of the castoff product. With the presentation of the Index.01, Salomon also announces a reappearance strategy were users must register under Salomon.com. They obtain a shipping label that enable to send the shoes to a nearby collection center – free of charge. To diminish transport volume, the shoes will be collected there and shipped in bulks back to France for Salomon to use in future products.
The upper of the shoe is thin, breathable and comfortable. Comfort is a big thing with this shoe as there is basically nothing to complain about. No rubbing or pinching wherever at the heel or toe section. Salomon chose the use of recycled polyester, which in case of this shoe, originates from old plastic bottles. The plastic flasks are undone into polyester fibers, which prevents the bottles from landing on landfill or being incinerated.
The Index.01 is the first creation out of the promising and exiting Play Minded Program. Salomon aims to take the full life circle of their product and tries to keep the impact on the environment as low as possible. It will be exited to see what’s next.
A comprehensive look at the back part of the shoe highlighting the unusual designed silhouette of the gigantic white TPU sole.
A meek but very substantial detail that this shoe has to offer is the plain performance. Overall, this is a no-nonsense shoe. The stride feels natural and there is no unusual stress to the body of any kind. It is a fantastic and reliable training shoe and the curved sole drives a good bit of speed into the stride without stressing too much.
To guarantee a proper all-around recycling circle, simplicity is key. Primarily the Salomon engineers were targeting to use just only one material to reach their prime goal. Previous prototypes I had seen used only one material – thermoplastic polyurethane foam (TPU). Still this concept wasn’t strong enough, so a second material had to be added and the upper is now made from recycled polyester as described earlier.
Like the midsole, the outsole is also made of the same TPU material. This is unlike many other brands that use rubber material for this part of the shoe. The durability of the Index.01 is not affected by this. Also because the heavy used parts of the sole are build extra rigid. Minor studs shape the design of the sole and the grip on road runs is faultless and I liked it a lot. Smooth and simple design is also put into the place at this part of the shoe.
The design is simple and smooth and mirrors the approach Salomon has with this line. The white colorway will eventually be obliterated by where the user takes this shoe.
In a quite a short time, I have become a vast admirer of this shoe. For me the Index.01 offers everything I enjoy in a day-to-day training shoe. Notwithstanding the weight, the shoe is fun to run in and quicker stuff is not a real problem. Would I race with it? Doubtless not. But everything in between is fine. The entire idea that is being the shoe ticks all my boxes and I love that Salomon takes this on so offensively and well thought out. Some companies have tried to tackle the environmental matters but no one in the way Salomon has. To me, the concept completely makes sense and I’m really looking forward seeing what else is next. Until then, I just go out for another loop in my Index.01.  

Movie of the day: Tony Martin – Qualen, Lehren, Perspektiven

Tune of the day: Anchorsong – Remedy

shoeporn: Puma – Deviate Nitro

Undoubtedly Puma is no stranger to the running game. One of their prime athltes was Ethiopian Abebe Bikila who won the marathon of the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo wearing a pair of Puma running shoes. Defending his title from Rome 1960, which he won without wearing any shoes. Having had a massive impact on the worldwide T&F scene with the likes of Linford Christie and legendary Wilson Kipketer, the company further increased their fanbase with the early signing of superstar Usain Bolt. When Puma signed Bolt in 2003, he was only 16 years old, but this deal certainly paid off.
Although being a recognized brand within the sprint scene, the company seemed to have forgotten its roots that, besides football, lies within running. In the beginning of 2021 a lot of professional runners switched sponsors and Puma appeared behind the name of a lot of recognized distance runners. With the Nitro range the company seem to hit the scene with new and promising products.
The Deviate range symbols Pumas homecoming to the serious performance side of running. The very first prototypes made a lot of noise within the scene and Puma marked their return to the market with their interpretation of a carbon-fiber plate road running shoe.
In 1924 Rudolf and his brother Adolf “Adi” Dassler formed the so called “Dassler Brothers Shoe Factory”. When they split in 1948, Adi went on to develop his own brand named Adidas and Rudolf established a new company called Ruda. Ultimately he changed the companies name into Puma and introduced the well-known symbol and the characteristic “Formstrip” in 1958. Until today both companies are situated in the small Franconian town Herzogenaurach in Bavaria, Germany.
Puma offers two high-end models. The Deviate Nitro that’s studied here and the Deviate Elite as the absolute top range model. The crucial alteration between these two shoes is the foam material. Back in the days, way before the carbon excitement, companies used EVA material as the attention was more on cushion then on rebound. Then the carbon-bouncy propaganda took over and nothing has been the same since.
The so-called Pebax material is the new reference class for springy shoes. Every company does use somewhat comparable. So does Puma for the Elite Version. The Nitro instead has a TPE sole. The presentation of this sole paired with the carbon plate is incredible. The structure and the placement of the foam generates a tremendously comfortable and lively piece of equipment. The Deviate Nitro is well-cushioned and the toe-off is speedy and energetic as you stride forward.
A very nice feature of the Deviate line is that there are specific models for women offered. These versions have slimmer heel sections, lower instep, and a carved arch for a specific fit. A feature that should be a standard by now.
A feature that made the shoe very comfortable for me, was this little feature in the back of the heel section. These pads are meant to lock the foot in the shoe and avoid slipping. Typically I tie my shoes very loose and this really made a difference to me, especially when running a bit faster.
The natural environment for this shoe is the road. And that’s what the so-called PumaGrip does best. A solid and sturdy rubber provides great traction on non-technical environment. I used this shoes also on lighter and dry trails and had no problems.
Despite the tendency of other running brands to use other expert rubber companies for the outsole material, Puma decided to create their own. The result is a good mix of rubbers that create a great and solid feeling for the ground and a material that appears to last well. I have about 400 kilometers on my pairs and it is astonishing how less wear this shoe has.
While I was training with the Deviate Nitro the last few weeks, some of my training buddies got curious and one of the most asked questions was if this shoe is a racing or training shoe. Until now, I do not really have an appropriate response to this question. The shoe is light, the shoe is speedy, direct on the ground it feels yet very comfortable. Would I race with it? I probably would. Until now I ran the Deviate Nitro during several trainings, from commute runs, long runs to track work and fartleks. I keep loving the shoe for it reliability during all these occasions. Pumas return to proper running shoes suprised me and it will be interesting to see where the brand goes from here.

Tune of the day: Brockhampton – Roadrunner: New Light, New Machine

shoeporn:Nike – Pegasus 35

shoeporn: Hoka One One – Challenger ATR 4

Hoka One One takes its most popular road model to the trails. The latest Challenger ATR4 could be considered the  dirty and rough brother of the Clifton 4.
By now it is no secret that the bulky Hoka One One-style does not mean your are dealing with a lot of weight. With a mere of 265 gram (in my size US13) the Challenger ATR4 continues what runners admire about the brand. Loads of cushion with less weight.
As mentioned in earlier Hoka One One reviews, the brand name origins from the Maori language with the loose meaning “fly over the earth”. Knowing this, it might explains the logo. Here placed on top of the romy toe box.
If Salomon would have known what their previous employers were up to. Nicolas Mermoud and Jean-Luc Diard found the Hoka One One as they were seeking for more comfort and better protection while running long and on trails. They developed the bulky shoes in a time when the Minimalistic trend had its peak (anno 2009). The unusual design quickly caught the attention of the ultra trail running scene. Thanks to the open-minded community the trend spread fast.
Active Foot Frame – The fourth version of the Challenger blends into the previous version as a properly cushioned off-road shoe. This time though the sole feels more rigid and liked it even more. Also the quality of the outsole is significantly better. While i had my issues with the rubber quality on the older versions, it seems that this time the sole does not show as much wear as before. The internal heel counter is another new feature. I like the additional support.
And this is the design of the outsole. It is not an aggressive style and definitely not made for highly technical trail or off-trail adventures.  I life in a town and need to get to my local trails via cemented roads. The Challenger combines my needs of trail and road running perfectly.
Meta – Rocker – A detailed look at the oversize EVA midsole of the Challenger ATR 4. The base of a well well-cushioned shoe.
Hoka One One gave the new toe box a little update. They enlarged it and incorporated thicker material on the overlay. While this makes the toe box a bit stiffer then the previous version, it also ensures more safety for the feet.
Quick facts: Offset: 5 mm Forefoot: 24 mm Heel: 29 mm
A thinner and more breathable upper create a pretty comfortable feeling. Dual-layer mesh balances support, durability, and breathability.
The stack height of the new Challenger model is 2mm thicker. This adds up to a mere of 31mm in the heel.
The Challenger Series can be seen as the trail flagship of Hoka’s product range.
While older models felt a bit spongy and insecure on the trail, the new midsole material creates a super supportive and firm ride. Long days on the trails take less out of your body. Hoka established the this new way of cushioning and still pushes the development. My quads and back certainly enjoy it.
The re-designed upper definitely earn some style points.
A daily workhorse and a slick and reliable shoe for trail outings. With the 4th installment of the Challenger ATR series, Hoka One One made a great shoe even better. It is hard to overlook the benefits of this comfortable yet light and fast shoe. Racing longer distances does make this shoe a great partner, daily training, commute and mixed terrain is something where i use the Challenger ATR 4.

 

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